Even More Gamer Tattoos That You Never Asked to See

We had some fun looking at some gamer tattoos a while back and the post ended up being the top commented post of any other on the blog. I figured it might be time to take a look at a few more gamer tattoos, including some that are cringe worthy beyond compare. And just to be clear once more, all my comments here are in good fun and shouldn’t be taken too seriously, ok? So, let’s see what we have.

Between the gauged ear and the ridiculous hair you wouldn’t think that a tattoo could make things much worse, but holy Capcom, this pair of tattoos lowers the bar to new lows. With the binary code on the back of his head and Ryu’s fireball firmly within his hairline, he can fortunately cover this up by letting his hair grow out. But hey, with such awesome tats, why would you, right?

What is wrong with Sonic’s hands and feet?! His fingers look more tangled than a politician’s lies. The white from his eyes is bleeding onto his face, and he’s just looking a little distorted from top to bottom. Sonic’s strength has always been speed, so I’m guessing this tattoo was laid down rather quickly.

There’s no way she’ll ever regret this decision. Nintendo Zappers with crooked barrels, some mushrooms, stars, and a Pac-Man cherry just for good measure. It’s like a buffet of bad decisions. At least we know she won’t be one of those gross 60 year old ladies trying to rock the bikini, shame will dictate that.

Guitar Hero will always be popular and cool, right?

Tattoo Artist: Now let me just double check, you said you wanted half of the controller on each hand?

Tattoo Dude: Yeah, man. I often walk around with my hands like this because I have to beg for food since I’m not smart enough to hold a job. Seeing this will remind me of how awesome the PS3 is.

Not all of these look terrible. I just have to wonder how long she’s going to love Kirby. Many tattoos are done under the folly of shortsightedness, but Kirby seems like one of those things that you’ll stop having a deep love for as you age. The artist did do a pretty good job, however.

Most parents despise their kids playing video games. I really hope that this girl’s mom had a love for the SNES, or that’s just disrespect for the deceased right there. It’s kind of like if you put the date your dad died on your arm along with an image of you leaving the lights on and the water running in the sink.

I’m guessing she’ll be happy this is on her back so that she doesn’t have to see it every time she’s getting undressed. This is a prime example of why you don’t let your 4 year old nephew draw up your tattoo for you.

I can’t imagine how much easier it is to get a job when you walk in, sit down, and answer questions from your potential employer while you both try to act like that huge facial tattoo isn’t there.

Some people put the name of their wife or girlfriend on their arm. This dude put his gamertag there. I think that says more about him than I ever could.

I’m actually really sorry for this. I’m kind of left speechless on this one.

Another two that actually look pretty good, but I question their size and whether or not these girls really want to have these there permanently. They do look like well done tattoos, however.

Pretty dumb, man. Pretty dumb. Of course, if you’re such an elite hacker, I’m sure you can get this post taken down.

The fad of making tattoos look like skin peels is getting played out, so why not combine it with what’s probably the most overused gaming tattoo image? Sweet, man.

I have more that have been sent in, and more that I found myself doing a quick check around, but I’ll need to stop here for now. After a while you just start feeling a bit depressed by the poor decisions that other gamers are making. With that said, I’m sure I’ll be coming out with a third of these posts soon. If you want to see the first gamer tattoo post, check it out here: http://stupidgamer.com/2008/03/31/because-nobody-asked-for-itbad-gamer-tattoos/

Hacker takes control of Stepto’s Live account, posts video

For those that aren’t familiar with Stepto, he’s head of the Xbox Live Policy and Enforcement Team. Basically his team is responsible for banning cheaters, hackers, or suspicious accounts. The hacker, known as PredatorSik, recorded himself toying around with Stepto’s account after he was able to gain access. PredatorSik then threw the video up on YouTube and sort of nerded out and cussed his way through a string of words of disbelief. We’ll see if the video remains up on YouTube, as I’m sure this kid will be running from Microsoft’s lawyers in the coming days. Check out the video.

http://www.youtube.com/v/ryfZv_qq7Uk

BeadShot turns screenshots into bead art

An artist and avid gamer is creating some pretty cool art in a medium we rarely see: beads. At BeadShot.com you can see some examples of the artist’s work, where he’s taken popular characters from video games and movies and has recreated their likeness and poses with beads. Once the beads are arranged and the work is complete, the beads are melted together to create a single piece. You can even see a full recreation of the first level of Donkey Kong hanging on what appears to be the artist’s wall. Overall the outcome is quite cool and worth hitting the link to check out his work.

Link: www.beadshot.com

Join our Facebook Page and Win Free Games!

We often give away games and prizes on our podcast and forums, but we’ve started giving out stuff on our Facebook page as well. So why do we do this? Well, we appreciate the support you guys give us by listening to our show, posting in our forums, reading the blog, and most of all, clicking on our ads. We don’t keep our ad money, it’s usually used to fund these contests, pay for our hosting, or buy equipment for our shows and video productions.

Right now we have a contest going on to win a free copy of Super Mario All Stars for the Wii. All you need to do is post which is your favorite Mario game and you’re entered. The contest closes on Sunday, March 27, and our winner will be notified on Monday. Soon after we’ll have a contest for Alan Wake, and all you need to do to be entered into that one is just like our Facebook page.

Also, keep an eye on the forums for more contests and listen to the podcast. Below are some helpful links to get into the contests.

Best Game Ever: Star Wars: TIE Fighter

Note: Best Game Ever is a series of posts I’ll be doing dedicated to the best games ever made. Each game I profile will be a game I’d accept as someone’s answer to the question, “what do you think the best game ever is?” So please, do not email me and tell me I’m stupid for posting about game X when game Y is clearly superior. And you never know, game Y might be the next game profiled. For more in the series, check out the “best game ever” category in the side bar.

The Force is strong with this one.

There used to be a time when having a PC for games meant that you played with more than just a mouse/keyboard or joystick. Back in the ’90s, it was almost a necessity to own some sort of flight stick. While it didn’t require a flight stick, Star Wars: TIE Fighter was easily the best reason to own one. I personally had the Flightstick Pro, and I probably logged enough hours on TIE Fighter to become a certified pilot.

Released in the summer of 1994, Star Wars: TIE Fighter was the much anticipated sequel to Star Wars: X-Wing. Bringing to the table a better flight engine, improved graphics, and better effects, TIE Fighter provided the ultimate flight combat experience in its time. The missions were laid out with both primary and secondary objectives, the story was interesting, and the game really forced you to use strategy and well timed attack runs in order to be successful.

Star Wars: TIE Fighter and its expansion Defender of the Empire are easily one of the best PC gaming experiences ever created. For all the Star Wars games that have been released, none have done so great of a job of bringing such a strong sense of immersion. If you’ve never played TIE Fighter and you can drum up the means to do so, definitely get right on it ASAP. Also make sure to check out Star Wars: X-Wing (and its expansions) and X-Wing vs TIE Fighter as well.

For these reasons and more not stated, Star Wars: TIE Fighter is the best game ever.

Game and gadget reviewers, stop using these terms

Cliches are never a good thing to find in professional reviews. Often times we lean on them to convey an idea or concept in a quick or easy manner, but when we’re evaluating a product, it’s really important to avoid cliches and to opt for a more detailed and concrete description. Some things probably bother me more than most, and I probably use some terms and descriptive techniques that bother people, but here’s my list of terms I’d like to see banned from usage in game and gadget reviews.

Sleek

Often times people describe an interface, a menu system, or a hardware design as being sleek. The problem is that it’s a completely unhelpful term that vaguely implies a modern and clean look and feel. It can also mean streamlined, smooth, glossy, contoured, smooth, or even deceitful. It’s much more helpful to JUST SAY WHAT makes the object in question “sleek.” If we’re talking about a game’s menu system, use the extra words and say, “the game offers a streamlined menu system that’s easy to navigate and intuitive in its design.” If we’re talking about an mp3 player, I’d much prefer to read, “the player is smooth and comfortable to hold. The lines give the device an attractive look and the construction is tight and makes the player feel solid and modern.” Tell us what makes the object in question sleek, not that it simply is. Note: Slick is often used the same way as sleek for similar reasons.

Mixed Bag

Mixed bag is used a whole heck of a lot instead of saying that something has some high points as well as some low points. It’s far more effective to detail out the products high and low points and show the reader that it is indeed a mixture of pros and cons that constitute the overall package. Even when the term isn’t used to replace proper description, it still makes a terrible lead in phrase to say, “graphically the game is a bit of a mixed bag.”

Product X is Product Y on Steroids

This is another term that’s just a bit lazy to me. I’ve used it in the past, but I’ve resolved to not do it again. Saying that Vanquish is like Gears of War on steroids is a bit of a disservice to both games; but worse yet, it’s a disservice to your audience. Some gamers may be reading your Vanquish review because they have an interest in the game, but they may have not played Gears of War. Also, aside from the cover system, there’s very little Gears in Vanquish (and that applies to many similar comparison using this cliche). It’s far more effective to just describe the game or product and allow the readers to draw parallels between it and similar content or products. It is perfectly fine to compare things to one another, but go deeper than the surface of just a cliche.

Killer App

Killer app is synonymous to saying “AAA” or “must have.” Usually killer app is used when saying that a certain title fills an important gap in a console’s lineup or when this single game is going to send people out to stores in droves to pick it and its affiliated console up in droves. The term has just been overused far too much.

Cookie Cutter

Another shortcut term that allows the reviewer to avoid writing a detailed description. It’s not enough to say that a game only “offers cookie-cutter gameplay.” Use your words, people. It doesn’t take much more time to explain that the game uses tired tropes and conventions, but it’s far more useful to readers to know which aspects of the gameplay you’re referring to rather than just applying a single blanket term to everything.

Really I could name many more terms that I dislike, but there’s just one thing to remember when writing. Detail and specificity are always more valuable to readers than the repetition of cliches, even if the cliche is generally a well understood one within the context in which it’s being applied. That said, I’d invite all of you to ignore my past usage of many of these things, mmmkay?

Is the ESA creating a closed loop with their E3 Expo media requirements?

Note: In the interest of full disclosure, I have been accepted to E3 for 2011 and have had a media pass for the last 8 years. However, I have seen many great journalists denied entry for E3 2011 that have always been able to go in the past.

Every year the E3 Expo is the industry’s biggest showcase for games to be released over the next year or two. Major announcements are made at E3, media is able to get early impressions of games behind closed doors, and general attendees can play games that are still months from seeing a release date. For those that aren’t too familiar with the requirements to enter E3, here are the ways to get in:

  • Qualified Media – The ESA gives free E3 passes to qualified media members. This is how I’ve been going for the past 8 years. To qualify, you have to prove you are employed by a member of the gaming press and the site you represent must meet certain standards (traffic, quality, reputation, etc.) defined by the ESA for entry. The number of attendees from each media outlet allowed depends on how prominent your site is in the industry (usually defined by traffic numbers).
  • Exhibitor – If your company is showing games, hardware, accessories, or industry related services off at E3, you’ll be allowed to enter. A company can only secure a limited number of exhibitor badges, which depends on the amount of floor space they purchase.
  • Exhibits Only – Exhibits only badges are for people who are part of the industry but do not qualify for media or exhibitor badges. This can be developers, hardware makers, entertainment outlets, or anything related to the industry; even if the connection is rather loose. These passes are not free and must be purchased. Journalists that don’t qualify for media badges may get an exhibits only badge, but they must pay the $400 ($500 after the early registration deadline) for entry.

Nobody under 18 is allowed in the show, but exceptions are made for VIP guests (usually famous teen actors/singers). VIP passes may be handed out by the ESA or certain companies may secure them for special guests or contest winners. All of that looks fine, but I have issues with how the media passes are doled out.

What is happening with E3 is that only the bigger media outlets are being given free passes. I spoke with someone in the registration office and they said it is to cut down on overall numbers and that publishers have been asking for tighter control for years. Again, I  understand the need for crowd control, but the ESA is going about this all wrong. Rather than locking out the smaller sites, it would be far better to limit the numbers being sent by qualified sites. By locking out the smaller media outlets and the enthusiasts, they’re basically killing the best chance each year that these sites have at increasing their readers since they won’t have access to E3 demos and to publishers for interviews. Everybody will still flow to IGN, Gamespot, 1UP, etc. since they’re the ones allowed into the show with full media access. Also, the companies that can most afford to send people to Los Angeles for three days are getting their passes for free.

The ESA is playing a huge role in deciding the shape of games journalism, and it’s disappointing that the locking out of the little guys from E3 will be far more harsh this year than ever, despite the growing swell of support for the enthusiast press by the gaming audience. While this is all disappointing, it’s even more unnecessary to give large outlets a disproportionate presence when you consider all of the pre-E3 events.

Publishers understand that E3 is a busy convention and there’s not quite enough time for every game to get covered in great depth. They also know that the show floor is loud and crowded. In response to this, many publishers hold pre-E3 events where they invite top media sites and freelancers to come see their E3 offerings ahead of time. These sites get quality hands on time with the E3 demos before the kiosks have ever even been set up in the Los Angeles Convention Center. When IGN rolls into E3, they’ve already played most of the stuff they’re worried about and the stories have been written. So why do the big boys need to send 50 people? Well, they don’t really. In speaking with editors from larger sites they’ve always told me that E3 is an excuse to get away for a few days, attend some parties, and hang out with other journalists. They don’t have to sit up until 4:00am each night trying to pound out demo impressions on their computers because they wrote them up the week before after attending a pre-E3 event.

Given that these pre-E3 events are becoming more and more common, it seems that the ESA should be more lenient about letting smaller sites into the show. They can still have restrictions on entry, but maybe they need to scale back the numbers being sent by large companies and reduce the number of attendee passes they sell. Obviously the ESA is hoping that those that don’t quite make their thresholds for media clearance will buy their way in, but ultimately most smaller sites will just have to sit the show out.

Maybe publishers will be happier with the smaller crowds this year when they’re able to have more breathing room in their booths, but I have to wonder how much they’ll love the decreased chatter from the enthusiast press when it comes to impressions of their demos that they spent millions of dollars to put on exhibit at E3 2011.

I’m hoping that those that struggle to get into the show this year are able to make their voices heard and that for E3 2012 the ESA will re-evaluate their approval process and allow for the little guy to attend the show again. If anybody is left out of the show this year, and they need a hands on preview or two, let me know and I’d be happy to do some freelance work free of charge in exchange for a link or two my way.